product thinking

5 Jun 2015 | Lean Inception

I really like the way Jason Fried stated the sentence. Prior to getting into design thinking and lean start-up, I was just another software developer creating features for a software product. I was coding features to a product, so someone would then sell the product or convince the final users to use it: the product was full of shiny features. Unfortunately many of these features were never used, at least as original thought of.

Lately I have changed. I got into design thinking and lean start-up. I even wrote an eBook about a recipe for getting into the MVP, the Minimum Viable Product to be used (a hypothesis) by a final user in order to accomplish goal. Just like Jason said, it might sound similar, but it is very different.

Nowadays, I am interested in the final user and her business goal. The product feature(s), or in better words, the minimum viable product feature(s) is focused on what the persona is attempting to do. So it is not about what the product can do for her. It is about what she can do with the MVP to better fulfill her needs or accomplish her business goal. As described on the eBook, the MVP is thought off in the perspective of the main users and their journeys to accomplish a business goal: features are just things (the simpler, the better) on the way to get there.

 

Paulo Caroli

Paulo Caroli is the author of the best-selling book “Lean Inception: How to Align People and Build the Right Product” (the first on a series of books about Lean Strategy and Delivery). He's also the creator of FunRetrospectives.com , a site and book about retrospectives, futurospectives and team building activities. Caroli writes on this blog frequently. Receive the next post in your email. Sign up here .
MVP philosophy and the Justified True Belief

MVP philosophy and the Justified True Belief

Lately I have been listening and reading about philosophy and I came across a theory that got me thinking about hypothesis driven development, Minimum Viable Product (MVP) and validation. It is accredited to Plato from around 369 BC with the name of Justified True...

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